LDP singing the same old tune

22 Dec

LDP singing the same old tune

Tonight on NHK news there was a round table interview of an LDP representative. There were a series of questions about the nation of Japan and the LDP’s plan for the future.

If you wade through the obfuscation the answers were very simple.

The LDP is going to borrow large amounts of new debt to fuel major construction projects across the country. Earlier this week the new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe had a meeting with the Bank of Japan Governor Masaaki Shirakawa. Shirakawa has an M.A in economics from the university of Chicago and is a DPJ approved nominee who was appointed by LDP prime minister Fukuda. At the time the DPJ controlled the upper house of parliament and kept the BOJ position open for 3 weeks which was a major gaffe and the first time since WW2 that Japan hadn’t had a bank governor.

Mr Shirakawa is most likely going to be replaced as soon as the LDP can muster the time and effort to do so. As a result of what will probably be Shirakawa’s pink slip and the BOJ awaiting its marching orders Abe did most of the talking. The BOJ will fall into the LDP line of promoting inflation, deregulation and economic growth. It then delivered another round of stimulus which has become rather SOP in Japan these days. It will also stand ready to open the spigots of further monetary easing early next year.

The LDP is going to begin construction of new nuclear power plants. This was an easy issue to see through as its only a question of time before the government begins to pressure the various prefectures to turn on their idle power plants. This flies in the face of what appears to be public sentiment, however this blogger feels that Japan is really in a difficult position when it comes to energy consumption. The main obstacle for the LDP to overcome is policy wonk insistence that active faults lie beneath nuclear power plants all across the country. So there will be a gradual insistence from the top that “things are fine” or if they are not “we can restructure things so they will be fine”. Thus overcoming DPJ policy that led to almost every plant closing as they phased in their usual maintenance programs.

How will the younger educated urban people feel about this ? It should be very interesting to see how things shake out going forward. I am hoping it gets testy as it is very unlike Japanese to cause others to lose face. After the Fukushima fiasco, lies and criminal mismanagement I doubt the public will approve of the LDP’s decision. Changes will start brewing shortly after the LDP forces through the policy. It is probably the right decision in the long run but as usual the party doesn’t rule by consensus but rather by edict. It will most likely be their undoing.

Further indicators include the appointment of LDP policy chief Akira Amari as minister in charge of the economic revival. Amari is a well known pro nuke guy. Amari will head the Council on Economic and Fiscal policy which the LDP will use to pass further regulation measures. In a country where regulation is paramount I for one am looking forward to how things will turn out. Will Amari be up for the task ? At 63 years old I would say the jury is still out but I wouldn’t bet on him staying too long.

It appears that Mr Aso who is himself a former Prime Minster will be put in charge of the ministry of Finance as well as becoming deputy prime minister. This blog has a rather negative spin on Japanese politics but I do hold hope for Mr Aso. He is quite capable and unlike Abe knows how to lead. Further posts appear to be held for Mr Tanigaki and Ishihara. Ishihara is a firebrand nationalist politician who has a lot of support from the Japanese conservatives because he speaks his mind and supports popular positions on among other things the Senkaku islands that I wrote about earlier in this blog.

Look for Mr Abe to focus on economics first, and then trying to fix the numerous other issues facing this country. He may quite possibly try and reform the constitution which will have a very interesting affect on the regional powers who carefully watch the Japanese. The last time Mr Abe was in office, his term was most known for a series of scandals, outrage and mismanagement leading to his leaving office and eventually the DPJ taking power.

With 40% of seats in parliament being controlled by the urban voting block I believe that Abe can keep the pork machine doling out enough jobs to keep the rural 60% of seat holders economically satisfied. I think that ultimately the major factor will be if something non economic gets in the way of the LDP’s deregulation and constitutional plans for change.

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